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The Probert Encyclopaedia of Heraldry

EAGLE

In heraldry, the eagle is symbolic of fortitude.
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EMBATTLED

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In heraldry, the term embattled refers to something having its edge broken like battlements. The term is applied to a bearing such as a fess, bend, or the like.
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EMBORDERED

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In heraldry, embordered refers to having a border of the same colour, metal or fur as the field.
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EMBOWED

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In heraldry, embowed refers to a charge which is bent.
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ENARCHED

In heraldry, enarched describes a bend or other ordinary bent into a curve.
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ENDORSE

In heraldry an endorse is a subordinary, resembling the pale, but of one quarter of its width.
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ENFILED

In heraldry, enfiled describes an object having some other object, such as the head of a man or beast, impaled upon it. For example a sword may be said to be enfiled of the thing which it pierces.
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ENGOULED

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In heraldry, the term engouled (engoulee) means partly swallowed and describes an object disappearing into the jaws of anything, for example an infant engouled by a serpent. The term is also applied to an ordinary, when its two ends to issue from the mouths of lions, or the like, for example a bend engouled.
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ENGRAILED

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In heraldry, engrailed describes something indented with small concave curves, as the edge of a bordure, bend, or the like.
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ENHANCED

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In heraldry, the term enhanced refers to any ordinary borne higher up than its usual position.
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ENMANCHE

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In heraldry, the term enmanche describes something resembling, or covered with, a sleeve. It is said of the chief when lines are drawn from the middle point of the upper edge upper edge to the sides.
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ERASED

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In heraldry, erased (eradicated) describes something represented with jagged and uneven edges, as is if it has been torn off as distinct from coupe which means cut off cleanly. The term is particularly used to describe the depiction of a head of a beast. If the charge is a small tree branch, appearing as though torn off, it is described as slipped, while a large tree branch depicted the same way is described as snagged, though a tree ripped up by the roots is erased.
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ERMINE

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In heraldry, ermine is a fur represented by an argent field, tufted with black. Ermines is the reverse of ermine, being black, spotted or timbered with argent. Erminois is the same as ermine, except that or is substituted for argent.
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ESCALLOP

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In heraldry, an escallop is a representation of a scallop-shell. It was originally worn as a sign that the wearer had made a pilgrimage to the shrine of St James at Compotella, in Spain. Later it was worn to indicate that the bearer or his ancestors had been at the Crusades or had made long pilgrimages.
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ESCALLOPED

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In heraldry, escalloped (escallopee) describes an escutcheon covered with overlapping curved lines resembling the outline of a scallop-shell.
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ESCARBUNCLE

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In heraldry, an escarbuncle is a shield-boss developed into a decorative structural metal-work.
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ESCARTELLY

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In heraldry, escartelly refers to a form of ornamentation consisting of one third being notched in a rectangular shape. For example, escartelly may describe an ornamental line of division per fesse.
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ESCROL

In heraldry, an escrol is a long strip or scroll resembling a ribbon or a band of parchment, or the like. They were anciently placed above the shield, and supporting the crest. In modern heraldry, an escrol is a similar ribbon on which the motto is inscribed.
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ESCUTCHEON

In heraldry, the escutcheon is the surface, usually a shield, upon which bearings are marshalled and displayed. The surface of the escutcheon is called the field, the upper part is called the chief, and the lower part the base That side of the escutcheon which is on the right hand of the knight who bears the shield on his arm is called dexter, and the other side sinister.
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ESSORANT

In heraldry, essorant describes a charge of a bird borne on an escutcheon standing, but with the wings spread, as if it is about to fly.
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ESTOILE

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In heraldry, an estoile is a six-pointed star whose rays are wavy, instead of straight like those of a mullet.
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